The Society of the Cincinnati      
          of the State of South Carolina

ABOUT THE SOCIETY

The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina was formed on August 29, 1783, in Charleston with 117 Original Members under the leadership of General William Moultrie, its first president and the hero of the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. This engagement, termed one of the three most complete and decisive victories of the Revolution, is now known as the Battle of Fort Moultrie in honor of the patriot who commanded its defense.

The South Carolina Society, with about 250 members today, is one of the six original state societies which have been in continuous existence since 1783. The societies of the other original thirteen States and France became dormant for one reason or another, some during a period of opposition to the Cincinnati.

ABOUT THE SOCIETY

General William Moultrie (1822) by Charles Fraser

The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina was formed on August 29, 1783, in Charleston with 117 Original Members under the leadership of General William Moultrie, its first president and the hero of the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. This engagement, termed one of the three most complete and decisive victories of the Revolution, is now known as the Battle of Fort Moultrie in honor of the patriot who commanded its defense.

The South Carolina Society, with about 250 members today, is one of the six original state societies which have been in continuous existence since 1783. The societies of the other original thirteen States and France became dormant for one reason or another, some during a period of opposition to the Cincinnati.  

 

Today, all fourteen constituent societies are active.  They compose the General Society of the Cincinnati which is headquartered at Anderson House in Washington, D.C.

 

OUR HISTORY

The Society of the Cincinnati provides a living link with the American Revolution. A great many of its current members are descendents of 2403 Continental and foreign officers who joined as Original Members immediately after the Revolution or of other Continental officers who could have become Original Members but, for one reason or another, did not join the Society when it was formed. Usually these officers had three years service in that war, and many were present at the establishment of the General Society of the Cincinnati at Fishkill, New York, on May 10, 1783.


The Society’s charter or Institution states three purposes for its establishment: to preserve the rights and liberties for which the founders had fought, to promote the national honor and “dignity of the American Empire,” and to reinforce the cordial affection among officers by providing aid and assistance to officers and their families when in need. At a time when military pensions were not yet a reality this last purpose had instant and continuing importance.

 

Within a year State Societies, under the auspices of the General Society, were established in the thirteen original states and in France. Each State Society ran itself and sent representatives to the triennial meetings of the General Society.
 

Many American leaders who helped create this nation were Original Members of the Society: George Washington was its President General from 1783 until his death in 1799. Other well-known members include General Henry Knox, considered the Society’s originator, General Friedrich von Steuben its first presiding officer, Alexander Hamilton, and General Nathanael Greene. Foreign officers in the American cause who were Cincinnati include Generals Lafayette and Rochambeau, Admiral DeGrasse, all from France, and Colonel Kosciuszko from Poland.


Membership in the Society of the Cincinnati passes by descent. At present the State and French Societies have some 3,000 active members who continue their dedication to the original purposes of the Society.

The Society’s name is derived from that of Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus, a Roman farmer who left his plow to fight for his city. A successful general, he was acclaimed dictator but following his Roman victory returned to his plow. In a like manner, Americans, who had no standing army, left their shops and farms to fight the Revolutionary war. Following this, most returned to their original livelihoods.
 

A member of the Society, General Arthur St. Clair, named the city of Cincinnati when he chose the site as the capital of the Northwest Territory in 1790.


The Society adopted the bald eagle, already chosen as the emblem for the Great Seal of the United States, as its symbol on the suggestion of Major Pierre L’Enfant, a French officer who was later responsible for the design and layout of the City of Washington. A resplendent Diamond Eagle was presented to General Washington “in the name of all the sailors of the French nation” and has been worn by all succeeding Presidents General.  The Eagle is circumscribed with the words “OMNIA RELINQUIT SERVARE REMPUBLICAM” which mean "He abandons every thing to serve his country."

 

THE CITADEL MEDAL

The Society’s efforts in early years centered on aid to its own poor. More recently, one of the South Carolina Society’s most significant activities has been the annual award of THE CITADEL MEDAL.  This medal is presented annually to the cadet officer of each graduating class who best combines the qualities of a good soldier and a good citizen characteristics the Society would perpetuate. Recipients of the award are listed on a tablet in the foyer of Bond Hall at The Citadel and are listed below.

Recipients of the Citadel Medal

1962 - William C. Andersen

1963 - Thomas M. Snowden Jr.

1964 - John M. Foxworth

1965 - Robert D. Kerr

1966 - William J. Mansfield

1967 - Robert T. Roe III

1968 - William K. Thompson

1969 - Michael C. Bone

1970 - Rhett O. Wolfe

1971 - Larry D. Hudson

1972 - Jack C. Sloan

1973 - William A. Morrison

1974 - James L. Thomas Jr.

1975 - Edwin C. Haskell III

1976 - Richard S. Carey Jr.

1977 - David M. Rogers

1978 - James S. Knox Jr.

1979 - Benjamin R. Clark

1980 - Charles W. Manzione Jr.

1981 - Bruce M. Jones

1982 - Taylor W. Skardon

1983 - Attila J. Bognar

1984 - Anthony E. Gaiani

1985 - David G. Rogers

1986 - David A.B. Rosenblum

1987 - James W. Marlor Jr.

1988 - John M. Grantland

1989 - Christopher W. Chope

THE CITADEL MEDAL

The Society’s efforts in early years centered on aid to its own poor. More recently, one of the South Carolina Society’s most significant activities has been the annual award of THE CITADEL MEDAL.  This medal is presented annually to the cadet officer of each graduating class who best combines the qualities of a good soldier and a good citizen characteristics the Society would perpetuate. Recipients of the award are listed on a tablet in the foyer of Bond Hall at The Citadel and are listed below.

Recipients of the Citadel Medal

1962 - William C. Andersen

1963 - Thomas M. Snowden Jr.

1964 - John M. Foxworth

1965 - Robert D. Kerr

1966 - William J. Mansfield

1967 - Robert T. Roe III

1968 - William K. Thompson

1969 - Michael C. Bone

1970 - Rhett O. Wolfe

1971 - Larry D. Hudson

1972 - Jack C. Sloan

1973 - William A. Morrison

1974 - James L. Thomas Jr.

1975 - Edwin C. Haskell III

1976 - Richard S. Carey Jr.

1977 - David M. Rogers

1978 - James S. Knox Jr.

1979 - Benjamin R. Clark

1980 - Charles W. Manzione Jr.

1981 - Bruce M. Jones

1982 - Taylor W. Skardon

1983 - Attila J. Bognar

1984 - Anthony E. Gaiani

1985 - David G. Rogers

1986 - David A.B. Rosenblum

1987 - James W. Marlor Jr.

1988 - John M. Grantland

1989 - Christopher W. Chope

1990 - Patrick L. Dufraine

1991 - Robert C. Boyles

1992 - Ross H. Meyer

1993 - David M. Stephens

1994 - Robert C. Zyla

1995 - John K. Jarrad

1996 - Matthew W. Pantsari

1997 - Gregory L. Jones

1998 - Reggie S. Gibbes

1999 - Deedrick L. Reese

2000 - Hilburn B. Caulder

2001 - Mandy R. Garcia

2002 - Michael A. Hurst

2003 - Peter A. Mallory Jr.

2004 - Philip T. Medico III

2005 - Olivia L. Perry-Smith

2006 - Frederick O. Nash

2007 - Timothy A. Devine

2008 - Chase H. Mohler

2009 - Jonathan A. Brick

2010 - Jared M. Zentz

2011 - Cory R. Moyer

2012 - Ryan A. Schieber

2013 - Djordon-Lee T. Porter

2014 - Samuel L. Gibbons

2015 - Savannah Emmrich

2016 - Justine Zukowski

2017 - William Dallas Hooker III

2018 - John D. Cordes

2019 - Sarah Zorn

 

MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES

Membership inquiries may be directed to the Society Secretary at the address below.  Please include the name, rank and unit of your propositus as well as relationship to the propositus.

 

MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES

Membership inquiries may be directed to the Society Secretary at the address below.  Please include the name, rank and unit of your propositus as well as relationship to the propositus when submitting an inquiry.

Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina

Attn: Secretary

Post Office Box 1041

Charleston, SC 29402